Yukta vairagya or using everything in Krishna’s service

Yukta vairagya or using everything in Krishna’s service

By Haripada Dasa

In the Srimad Bhagavatam 7 canto, it is said: The Supreme Personality of Godhead and His devotee know how to use properly lust, anger, greed, illusion, pride, and envy.

In the Bhagavad Gita 3.37, Srila Prabhupada says: “…Therefore the origin of lust is also in the Supreme. If, therefore, lust is transformed into love for the Supreme, or transformed into Krishna consciousness – or, in other words, desiring everything for Krishna – then both lust and wrath can be spiritualized. Hanuman, the great servitor of Lord Rama, exhibited his wrath by burning the golden city of Ravana, but by doing so he became the greatest devotee of the Lord. Here also, in Bhagavad-gita, the Lord induces Arjuna to engage his wrath upon his enemies for the satisfaction of the Lord. Therefore, lust and wrath, when they are employed in Krishna consciousness, become our friends instead of our enemies.”

Greed is the cousin of lust, but there is a difference: the lusty person likes to enjoy living things, persons and animals; the greedy one, inert things like money, properties. In ISKCON now we will require spiritual greed to please the guru parampara to make in Mayapur Dhama the biggest temple in the world. How does the devotee use illusion? The devotees who distribute Srila Prabhupada’s books are quite expert in using illusion in Krishna’s service, saying to the people, ‘Oh you look a nice person!’

Once I gave a Science of Self-realization book telling him: ‘Oh you look a nice person,you look like the pope Paul the Second. He took out immediately his wallet and gave 100$. Srila Prabhupada said: “You just have to glorify them”. Another time I gave a book to a girl saying: “You have a saintly look”.She at once cooperated.

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Qualitative upgradation through forgiveness

Qualitative upgradation through forgiveness

By Shubha Vilas Das 

When it comes to making relations work for a lifetime, probably the most powerful and handy tool available is forgiveness. Every relationship goes through a patch where it begins to ferment from love to hate. The search is for a process that stops the fermentation from taking place.

When one embraces hate one forgets. When one embrace love one forgives. Hatred is like a storm. Every storm always begins with a small speck of dirt. Very soon the entire sky is engulfed by a dust tornado. Similarly, every hate begins with a single doubt that has hurt the ego. Very soon every corner of your intellect is covered by the tornado of negative thoughts about the person who has caused the hurt till love is just not visible. The feeling of being hurt is the highest when the person who has hurt you the most is the very person you love the most.

Forgiveness is the sign of being concerned about the future and hatred is the sign of being stuck to the past. Harbouring hatred means egoistic prosperity and emotional poverty. When you send hate signals to someone who has hurt you, your ego feels massaged at having got back aptly. But the flip side is that your emotions feel hurt, as the relationship of love has been stabbed from your side also. When the virus of hatred enters into your system it wrecks you emotionally.

Adopting forgiveness means egoistic depression and emotional prosperity. The ego is bound to feel depressed when you don’t retaliate while succumbing to hurt. However, with forgiveness, the relationship survives the storm of hatred. Forgiving when you are right means you value being right in the relationship over being right in your opinion.

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Envious and non-envious behavior

 Envy-Vaisnavas

By Devaki Devi Dasi

Envy towards seniors, juniors and equals.

The verse and purport to Srimad-Bhagavatam 4.8.34 describe the envious and non-envious behaviour towards seniors, equals and juniors. Srila Prabhupada explains things in simple yet profound terms which are of very practical relevance to us all.  In our relationship towards seniors, envy manifests by the fact that we are not jolly to receive them. We might think “Oh no, now this devotee is coming here to steal my show. Let’s hope he will leave again soon”. And we might ask him with a smile: “Nice to see you, Prabhu! How long are you staying?” 

And we might be relieved to hear that he is leaving again after three days.  The Hari-bhakti-vilasa cites the following quotation from the Skanda Purana  from a conversation between Markandeya and Bhagiratha, where it is said: “Whoever is envious of a Vaishnava or angry with him, or whoever does not  offer him obeisances or feel joy upon seeing him, certainly falls into a hellish condition.” Since envy leads to pride and arrogance we might even entirely ignore his presence and not give him any importance or attention whatsoever. We don’t offer respect and service, but rather we find fault and criticize. In this way, we diminish his position and thus establish ourselves to be superior. Sometimes these things go on in a very subtle way, and unless we are honest and introspective we might not even recognize they are there in our heart. A senior person might have given a class, and devotees might glorify him how well he spoke. But we feel impelled to comment: “Yes, it was OK, but he  could have quoted more verses-it was not so shastric.” Even if it wasn't-just the fact that we like to immediately point it out shows our propensity to diminish his position. Stating the negative only creates more negative energy and enlarges it. It does not purify or uplift anybody. Or someone might express his appreciation of a senior devotee, and we might feel compelled to say: “Actually, I know something about this person which you might not know,”-just to make it clear that he is not so advanced after all, and ultimately I am superior to him.

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